INTRODUCTION TO QABIL AJMERI

by sahal on October 19, 2012, 06:52:09 PM
Pages: [1]
ReplyPrint
Author  (Read 1437 times)
sahal
Umda Shayar
*

Rau: 109
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Waqt Bitaya:
46 days, 9 hours and 45 minutes.

love is in the Air,but CuPiD is alone here.

Posts: 4405
Member Since: Sep 2012


View Profile WWW
Reply with quote

                  ABDUR RAHEEM QABIL AJMERI

Qabil Ajmeri was born on August 27, 1931, as Abdul Rahim in Churli, a town located 24 miles from Ajmer, Rajistan. His father was Abdul Kareem, and his mother was Gulab Bugem. He received his early education in Ajmer. Ajmeri was orphaned at age seven; his father died of tuberculosis, and his mother died shortly afterwards. His younger sister, Fatma, died within a few years.[citation needed]

In January 1948, Ajmeri migrated to Pakistan with his brother, Sharif, without any provisions, after joining a caravan headed across the border. They then settled in Hyderabad, Sindh. After a while, Qabil’s brother contracted tuberculosis and died.

Ajmeri began writing poetry at an early age, and become famous in his locality for his poetry by age 14. His breakthrough came in a poetry session featuring the well-known poet Molana Mani Ajmeri, who had been reciting poems for some time and intended to go on hiatus.

After migrating to Hyderabad, Sindh, Pakistan in December 1947, he became popular at mushairas, and was recognized as a "senior" poet of Urdu[by whom?] at the age of 21, along with other veterans of Hyderabad, including Akhter Ansari Akberabadi, Mohsin Bhopali, and Himayat Ali Shaer. After migrating to Pakistan, he began writing a "qataa", or quatrain, every day in the daily Javed, Hyderabad. Later on, his quatrains were published in the weekly Aftab, Hyderabad.

Ajmeri wrote both ghazals and nazms. He published compilations of Urdu poetry and a volume on philosophy, named the "Deeda e Baydar". He is known as one of Urdu's last romantic poets.Ajmeri was admitted to several hospitals, and in 1960, he was sent to a Quetta sanatorium, where he met Nargis Susan, a nurse who was impressed with his poetry and who later converted to Islam. Afterwards, they married, and had one son, Zafar qabil.

Ajmeri died of tuberculosis in Hyderabad on October 3, 1962, at the age of 31.


ZABT GHAM KA SILA NA DE JANA
                  ZINDAGI KI DUA NA DE JANA
                 
                  BEKASI SE BADI UMEEDEIN HAI
                  TUM KOI ASRA NA DE JANA.


ZINDAGI KITNI MUKHTALIF THI MAGAR,
HUM TERE SAATH MUSKURATE RAHE.

DIN PARESHAN HAI,RAAT BHARI HAI,
ZINDAGI HAI KE PHIR BHI PYAARI HAI.

JANE KYA HO PALAK JHAPAK NE MEIN,
ZINDAGI JAAGTI HI REHTI HAI.


           QABIL AJMERI

               

Logged
sksaini4
Ustaad ae Shayari
*****

Rau: 853
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Waqt Bitaya:
112 days, 4 hours and 19 minutes.
Posts: 36414
Member Since: Apr 2011


View Profile
«Reply #1 on: October 19, 2012, 06:57:49 PM »
Reply with quote
 Applause Applause
Logged
sahal
Umda Shayar
*

Rau: 109
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Waqt Bitaya:
46 days, 9 hours and 45 minutes.

love is in the Air,but CuPiD is alone here.

Posts: 4405
Member Since: Sep 2012


View Profile WWW
«Reply #2 on: October 19, 2012, 06:59:57 PM »
Reply with quote
 Thankyou !
Logged
vimmi singh
Yoindian Shayar
******

Rau: 18
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Waqt Bitaya:
16 days, 55 minutes.

Posts: 1940
Member Since: Mar 2012


View Profile
«Reply #3 on: October 19, 2012, 09:48:14 PM »
Reply with quote
very nice sharing.......... Applause Applause Applause
Logged
~Chiragh~
Khaas Shayar
**

Rau: 259
Offline Offline

Waqt Bitaya:
87 days, 15 hours and 4 minutes.
Sabkaa maalik ek !

Posts: 9764
Member Since: Jun 2011


View Profile
«Reply #4 on: October 19, 2012, 11:27:27 PM »
Reply with quote
very nice sahal jee
what a sharing..
Applause Applause these are for your efforts. keep it up

Logged
nandbahu
Khaas Shayar
**

Rau: 114
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Waqt Bitaya:
18 days, 8 hours and 42 minutes.
Posts: 13682
Member Since: Sep 2011


View Profile
«Reply #5 on: October 20, 2012, 07:02:52 AM »
Reply with quote
nice sharing
Logged
sahal
Umda Shayar
*

Rau: 109
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Waqt Bitaya:
46 days, 9 hours and 45 minutes.

love is in the Air,but CuPiD is alone here.

Posts: 4405
Member Since: Sep 2012


View Profile WWW
«Reply #6 on: October 20, 2012, 10:34:01 AM »
Reply with quote
thank you friends ....
Logged
suman59
Umda Shayar
*

Rau: 102
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Waqt Bitaya:
20 days, 7 hours and 56 minutes.
Your Breath Touched My Soul

Posts: 6539
Member Since: Jun 2012


View Profile
«Reply #7 on: December 13, 2012, 08:38:01 PM »
Reply with quote
v.nice  Applause Applause
Logged
canvaskhi
Shayarana Mizaaj
**

Rau: 0
Offline Offline

Waqt Bitaya:
4 hours and 49 minutes.
Posts: 91
Member Since: Dec 2012


View Profile
«Reply #8 on: December 16, 2012, 04:49:45 AM »
Reply with quote
Qabil Ajmeri � �the inheritor of unfulfilled renown�


By Rauf Parekh

�Keats died of consumption before he had completed his 26th year, and is therefore, in Shelley�s phrase, one of �the inheritors of unfulfilled renown,�� wrote William Henry Hudson in An outline history of English literature of John Keats who, in Hudson�s words, was �the most romantic of the romantic poets�.

John Keats was not the only writer consumed by consumption, or galloping consumption, as TB or Tuberculosis is often referred to. A host of western writers fell victim to consumption, including great names such as Robert Louis Stevenson, Henry David Thoreau, the Bronte sisters, George Orwell, Franz Kafka � and the list goes on. Qabil Ajmeri was one of the poets of Urdu who succumbed to the disease. Like Keats, he too died young.

But it is Asraar-ul-Haq Majaaz, rather than Qabil Ajmeri, who is often compared to Keats because of the former�s romanticism, aesthetic passion and poetic genius. With due apologies to my progressive friends, I cannot resist quoting a critic who said Majaaz was Urdu poetry�s Keats who was abducted by the progressive wolves. He wanted to emphasise, perhaps, the sloganeering in Majaaz�s poetry that kept him from realising his true potential. In my opinion, however, it was not progressivism but alcoholism that kept Majaaz from achieving all that his gigantic genius was capable of, and which ultimately drew him of every spark � even that of life.


Qabil Ajmeri lived a life full of hardships and died at the age of 31, a lifespan much too short to allow the full bloom of poetic growth and artistic refinement. Yet his poetry shows the craft of an experienced poet and the feelings of a mature mind, not to mention his natural talent for a dainty poetic genre such as ghazal. His poetry had become so popular during even his own brief lifetime that he became the envy of many, and his many couplets are still quoted frequently, some of them having gained a proverb-like status.

Born on August 27, 1931, in Churli, a town located 24 miles from Ajmer, Qabil was orphaned when he was seven. His mother died shortly after the death of Qabil�s father, a tuberculosis patient, and his younger sister died within a few years. In January 1948, Qabil migrated to Pakistan with his brother, without any provisions, after joining a caravan headed across the border, where they settled in Hyderabad, Sindh. After a while, Qabil�s brother contracted TB and died. The series of deaths in the family left Qabil worn and drawn and his poetry grew more sorrowful then ever before.


Soon after migrating to Pakistan, he became popular at mushairas and was recognised as a �senior� poet of Urdu at the age of about 21, along with other veterans of Hyderabad such as Akhter Ansari Akberabadi, Mohsin Bhopali and Himayat Ali Shaer. This provoked the wrath and jealousy of some of his peers, who never really enjoyed the popularity at mushairas that they longed for and that Qabil found instantly.

Qabil had contacted TB early and was unable to pursue any career. Early in his life, for a while, he used to write applications outside government offices for a small fee, and did some journalistic work as well. After migrating to Pakistan, he began writing a �qataa�, or quatrain, every day in the daily Javed, Hyderabad. Later on, his quatrains were published in the fortnightly Aftab, Hyderabad.

For the treatment of TB, Qabil was admitted to several hospitals and in 1960 he was sent to a Quetta sanatorium where he met Nargis Susan, a nurse who was impressed with his poetry and who later embraced Islam, after which they got married. A son was born but Qabil could never really recover as a treatment for TB was yet to be found in those days. Qabil died in Hyderabad on October 3, 1962.

Ghazal was the genre in which Qabil chose to express himself, though his nazms, or poems, also reflect his mind. They are, however, fewer in number and do not really achieve the subtlety that his ghazals do. Ghazal, as Dr Farman Fatehpuri has said in his book Urdu ghazal aur Pakistani muaashra, is one of the most popular and most delicate yet most difficult of all genres of Urdu poetry. Ghazal demands classicism, symbolic icons, a deep sense of the poetic tradition, imagery and a diction of its own. This is one of the reasons why those who write ghazal can rarely master it fully and it remains elusive, just like the traditional lover of which it sings. The 20th century Urdu poets who truly recognised the texture and temperament of ghazal, and composed it in its all traditional beauty and delicacy, says Dr Fatehpuri, are few and far between and Qabil Ajmeri is one of them.

Qabil was a great improviser, too. His art lies essentially in improving upon all the traditional thoughts and topics of Urdu and Persian poetry. We see many classical or even modern ideas found elsewhere but Qabil gives them a new turn with a different treatment. What calls for a finer appreciation is Qabil�s ability to evoke fresh thoughts with an elegant style � achieved within a lifespan of 31 years that were spent mostly in looking for comfort.

Recently Waheedur-ur-Rehman Khan, a young researcher from Lahore, published his dissertation on Qabil, titled Mutala-i-Qabil. This much-needed work is really welcome as there has hardly been any reference material available on Qabil, apart from a few sporadic articles and a few special issues of some literary magazines � although more than a decade ago, Karachi�s Fareed Publishers published Qabil�s collected works, named Kulliyaat-i-Qabil.


Logged
canvaskhi
Shayarana Mizaaj
**

Rau: 0
Offline Offline

Waqt Bitaya:
4 hours and 49 minutes.
Posts: 91
Member Since: Dec 2012


View Profile
«Reply #9 on: December 16, 2012, 04:56:29 AM »
Reply with quote
Qabil Ajmeri the inheritor of unfulfilled renown


By Rauf Parekh

Keats died of consumption before he had completed his 26th year, and is therefore, in Shelleys phrase, one of the inheritors of unfulfilled renown, wrote William Henry Hudson in An outline history of English literature of John Keats who, in Hudsons words, was the most romantic of the romantic poets.

John Keats was not the only writer consumed by consumption, or galloping consumption, as TB or Tuberculosis is often referred to. A host of western writers fell victim to consumption, including great names such as Robert Louis Stevenson, Henry David Thoreau, the Bronte sisters, George Orwell, Franz Kafka  and the list goes on. Qabil Ajmeri was one of the poets of Urdu who succumbed to the disease. Like Keats, he too died young.

But it is Asraar-ul-Haq Majaaz, rather than Qabil Ajmeri, who is often compared to Keats because of the formers romanticism, aesthetic passion and poetic genius. With due apologies to my progressive friends, I cannot resist quoting a critic who said Majaaz was Urdu poetrys Keats who was abducted by the progressive wolves. He wanted to emphasise, perhaps, the sloganeering in Majaazs poetry that kept him from realising his true potential. In my opinion, however, it was not progressivism but alcoholism that kept Majaaz from achieving all that his gigantic genius was capable of, and which ultimately drew him of every spark even that of life.


Qabil Ajmeri lived a life full of hardships and died at the age of 31, a lifespan much too short to allow the full bloom of poetic growth and artistic refinement. Yet his poetry shows the craft of an experienced poet and the feelings of a mature mind, not to mention his natural talent for a dainty poetic genre such as ghazal. His poetry had become so popular during even his own brief lifetime that he became the envy of many, and his many couplets are still quoted frequently, some of them having gained a proverb-like status.

Born on August 27, 1931, in Churli, a town located 24 miles from Ajmer, Qabil was orphaned when he was seven. His mother died shortly after the death of Qabils father, a tuberculosis patient, and his younger sister died within a few years. In January 1948, Qabil migrated to Pakistan with his brother, without any provisions, after joining a caravan headed across the border, where they settled in Hyderabad, Sindh. After a while, Qabils brother contracted TB and died. The series of deaths in the family left Qabil worn and drawn and his poetry grew more sorrowful then ever before.


Soon after migrating to Pakistan, he became popular at mushairas and was recognised as a senior poet of Urdu at the age of about 21, along with other veterans of Hyderabad such as Akhter Ansari Akberabadi, Mohsin Bhopali and Himayat Ali Shaer. This provoked the wrath and jealousy of some of his peers, who never really enjoyed the popularity at mushairas that they longed for and that Qabil found instantly.

Qabil had contacted TB early and was unable to pursue any career. Early in his life, for a while, he used to write applications outside government offices for a small fee, and did some journalistic work as well. After migrating to Pakistan, he began writing a qataa, or quatrain, every day in the daily Javed, Hyderabad. Later on, his quatrains were published in the fortnightly Aftab, Hyderabad.

For the treatment of TB, Qabil was admitted to several hospitals and in 1960 he was sent to a Quetta sanatorium where he met Nargis Susan, a nurse who was impressed with his poetry and who later embraced Islam, after which they got married. A son was born but Qabil could never really recover as a treatment for TB was yet to be found in those days. Qabil died in Hyderabad on October 3, 1962.

Ghazal was the genre in which Qabil chose to express himself, though his nazms, or poems, also reflect his mind. They are, however, fewer in number and do not really achieve the subtlety that his ghazals do. Ghazal, as Dr Farman Fatehpuri has said in his book Urdu ghazal aur Pakistani muaashra, is one of the most popular and most delicate yet most difficult of all genres of Urdu poetry. Ghazal demands classicism, symbolic icons, a deep sense of the poetic tradition, imagery and a diction of its own. This is one of the reasons why those who write ghazal can rarely master it fully and it remains elusive, just like the traditional lover of which it sings. The 20th century Urdu poets who truly recognised the texture and temperament of ghazal, and composed it in its all traditional beauty and delicacy, says Dr Fatehpuri, are few and far between and Qabil Ajmeri is one of them.

Qabil was a great improviser, too. His art lies essentially in improving upon all the traditional thoughts and topics of Urdu and Persian poetry. We see many classical or even modern ideas found elsewhere but Qabil gives them a new turn with a different treatment. What calls for a finer appreciation is Qabils ability to evoke fresh thoughts with an elegant style  achieved within a lifespan of 31 years that were spent mostly in looking for comfort.

Recently Waheedur-ur-Rehman Khan, a young researcher from Lahore, published his dissertation on Qabil, titled Mutala-i-Qabil. This much-needed work is really welcome as there has hardly been any reference material available on Qabil, apart from a few sporadic articles and a few special issues of some literary magazines  although more than a decade ago, Karachis Fareed Publishers published Qabils collected works, named Kulliyaat-i-Qabil.


Logged
suman59
Umda Shayar
*

Rau: 102
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Waqt Bitaya:
20 days, 7 hours and 56 minutes.
Your Breath Touched My Soul

Posts: 6539
Member Since: Jun 2012


View Profile
«Reply #10 on: December 16, 2012, 07:24:53 AM »
Reply with quote
nice to know about ajmeri sb.
Logged
Aarish
Khususi Shayar
*****

Rau: 43
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Waqt Bitaya:
18 days, 16 hours and 12 minutes.

Posts: 1634
Member Since: May 2012


View Profile
«Reply #11 on: December 16, 2012, 08:36:34 AM »
Reply with quote
its really good to know about qabil ajmeri sb. thank you for sharing with us
Logged
sksaini4
Ustaad ae Shayari
*****

Rau: 853
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Waqt Bitaya:
112 days, 4 hours and 19 minutes.
Posts: 36414
Member Since: Apr 2011


View Profile
«Reply #12 on: December 16, 2012, 10:21:27 AM »
Reply with quote
good itself
Logged
Riyaz Ashna
Poetic Patrol
Yoindian Shayar
******

Rau: 2
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Waqt Bitaya:
29 days, 13 hours and 38 minutes.

Posts: 2728
Member Since: Nov 2009


View Profile
«Reply #13 on: December 16, 2012, 06:43:19 PM »
Reply with quote
Qabil sahab ke baare mein jaankari mili. Parekh sb.aapka bahot shukriya. Sach mein wo bahot unche darje ke shayar the.
Logged
Pages: [1]
ReplyPrint
Jump to:  

+ Quick Reply
With a Quick-Reply you can use bulletin board code and smileys as you would in a normal post, but much more conveniently.


Get Yoindia Updates in Email.

Enter your email address:

Ask any question to expert on eTI community..
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
November 13, 2019, 01:53:39 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Recent Replies
[November 13, 2019, 12:33:48 AM]

[November 12, 2019, 10:16:49 PM]

[November 12, 2019, 10:11:25 PM]

[November 12, 2019, 10:09:39 PM]

[November 12, 2019, 10:08:41 PM]

[November 12, 2019, 10:07:50 PM]

[November 12, 2019, 12:40:27 AM]

[November 12, 2019, 12:38:58 AM]

[November 12, 2019, 12:37:21 AM]

[November 11, 2019, 09:09:28 PM]
Yoindia Shayariadab Copyright © MGCyber Group All Rights Reserved
Terms of Use| Privacy Policy Powered by PHP MySQL SMF© Simple Machines LLC
Page created in 0.184 seconds with 26 queries.
[x] Join now community of 48403 Real Poets and poetry admirer